Technology Ideas: Padlet

Over the last two weeks I have been doing my best to bring more technology in to my classroom. This is something that is greatly emphasized at my school, and yet I still struggle with it. It’s not that I’m opposed to technology in my classroom, it’s just that I feel that there are always problems that pop up. Sometimes I feel that we are trying to incorporate technology for the sake of incorporating technology instead of actually increasing our classroom’s efficiency or learning. There have been several instances in which I’ve tried to use the latest app or web-based activity to teach a new lesson, but after trying to help students recover passwords, gain wi-fi access, and giving out separate instructions to Apple users and Android users, well I feel that I’ve lost too much instructional time. My classes are much too large to purchase tablets for everyone and even the computer labs are too small for my groups. So many obstacles!

Still, I know that there are those brilliant teachers out there using technology with such ease, and their lesson plans always go smoothly and are loved by the students. Their students are engaged and productive. Maybe I can find my way to this dream world? I’ve decided to give it another shot. So this past month I decided to try out one new idea. My goal was to focus on one new techie idea that could enhance what I’m already doing with my students and then I could try to work through the hiccups as they came along. I decided to use Padlet in my classroom, an oldie but goodie. You can find it at Padlet.com and it’s free. It allows myself and students to post anything and everything on the screen in real time. I decided perhaps this could enhance my classroom listening exercises.

If you’re looking for something fairly simple to start with, this is a great one. I already have my students listen to recordings each week in our “Listening Fridays”. After we listen together, we have a class discussion over what we heard. This is one of my students’ favorite activities each week, but it’s impossible to take input from every single student in a class of 50. With Padlet, I found that I’m finally giving every student a voice.

Here’s how it works:

  1. Have your students go to padlet.com and create a user account. If using cell phones, there is a free app that you can use.
  2. Create a Padlet! You can customize it in so many ways. Then post questions on the Padlet wall that you want students to answer.
  3. Give a link to the students to get to the padlet you created. There are a number of ways you can do this. I had the most success with embedding my padlet to our class website (as hosted by the school), so since students already were accustomed to going to this site, they had no trouble finding the padlet. OR, you can easily create a QR code just by looking at the “Share” options on your padlet. The padlet app has a QR reader built in.

Begin your discussion! Have students click anywhere on the padlet to share their response. Their answers will immediately pop up on everyone’s padlet no matter what screen they are looking at. I love this for our listening activities because the students can begin discussing the topic while still listening in silence. Students are held accountable for their answers because their user name will show up with what they type, thus taking care of the class clown that is always looking for the chance to be inappropriate.

It took 3 or 4 days for me to work out the best process for using this program, but now that I have the bugs worked out, I’m making it a point to use it with the students every week. They seem to be enjoying it and now since it’s a regular part of our class, it fits in to our lessons seamlessly. Victory!

I would love to hear how you use this program or another techie gadget in your classroom. What are your favorites?

 

 

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